Wednesday, 16 November 2011

Lesson:Solid modeling introduction



The Modeling application lets you create a mathematical representation of any physical part. The model is always created full size. If you need to scale down the part for the sake of a drawing sheet, that is a simple task.
After a model is created it can be
•analyzed for mass properties, reaction to physical loads, tested for interference with other parts, and many more;
•analyzed for its appearance by several methods - photorealistic renderings, reflection lines, and more;
•used to make tools for manufacturing the part;
•have information attached to it that can be used to convey inspection (and other) requirements, including Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing; and
•used to make a drawing of it with annotations (dimensions and notes), with complete associativity. If the part changes, the dimensions change automatically.
•build assembly etc…

A simple model:
You can create a model with primitive shapes (blocks, cylinders, cones, and spheres), and then unite, intersect, or subtract them from each other to achieve the shape you want. This method, however, is not recommended, because the various features are not associative.


Same model with different tech.
If the part you are modeling is basically block-shaped, you can start with a block, and then add features, such as holes, pads, bosses, pockets, blends, and chamfers (and more), to arrive at the final part. When done this way, everything is associated — if for example, the block changes, then everything changes with it.


Extruded or revolved parts
If the part you are modeling has a constant section that is moved in a specified direction to generate the basic shape, you can start with a string of objects (curves, edges, etc.) and extrude them into a model. You can then add more features to finish the part.


Swept parts
If the part you are modeling has a constant section that is moved along a path to generate the basic shape, you can sweep a string of objects (curves, edges, etc.) along the path. You can then add more features to finish the part.

Part with some irregular shape
If your part has some faces that are not planar, cylindrical, spherical or conical, you can create the part using any of the above methods, and then use a sheet body to trim the part. You can then add more features to complete the part.


Part with irregular shape
If your part has no planar, cylindrical, spherical or conical faces, you can create sheet bodies and then sew them together to create a solid body.


Sheet metal shapes
If your part is basically a sheet metal part, you can start with a set of sheet bodies, and then thicken them. You can then add more features to complete the part.


Primitives
•Block, cylinder, cone and sphere as base bodies
•Hole, pocket , slot and groove as removing material features
•Boss and pad as adding material features
•Boolean features like unite, subtract and intersect    











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